Theatre review: The One

by todadwithlove

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A man (Mark Storen) and a woman (Georgia King) encounter each other following “a summer of break-ups” when after a long time they find themselves single again. They make conversation, make love, fall in love. Soon, it has been two years since the nameless couple lived together, and things seem to be going well. Then, news arrives of his younger brother’s upcoming wedding that, when combined with the pressure of turning 40, prompts the man to want to advance his life through tying the knot.

Jeffrey Jay Fowler’s sobering account, a multi-award winning work first seen in Western Australia that now comes to Melbourne as part of the Fringe Festival, is an unflinching examination of the impermanence of intimacy in a relationship, and the confusing role of marriage in reversing this inevitability.

The man believes only by being husband and wife he can be relieved of the constant anxiety of losing the woman; when challenged, he lashes out that formalising status alone will compel people who have fallen out of love to fall back into love.

Interspersing third-person narratives with first-person embodiments, as the characters seamlessly segue in and out of scenes, Fowler uses rap and action and songs to tell the (ubiquitous) story, presenting perspectives and counter-perspectives on this universal tradition whose relevance appears to be atrophying.

Despite feeling terrible for turning down his sincere, down-on-one-knee proposal, the woman remains impervious in her conviction the legal arrangement is a mere mechanism to confer ownership of her future to the man, like chattel. Defiantly, she insists she prefers to wake in the morning, and choose to be with him, rather than allow any government to make that choice.

The play is delivered with plenty of energy and finesse in an absorbing production that reverberates with poetry and humour and utter realness. While sometimes funny this 60-minute rarest of gems is ultimately a portrait of the way we instinctively try to protect ourselves from getting hurt, by avoiding or pursuing matrimony, whatever the gender.

King gives a wonderfully intense performance: assertive, vulnerable, panic-struck by turns. She is most memorable in her portrayal of the inebriated guest at the brother’s wedding party mocking the whole celebration. And deeply we feel for Storen’s romantic, idealistic man, his consummate skills as a musician — liquid, melodious voice riding on waves of strings — connecting one with our softer, often-buried, forgotten sides.

Under Fowler’s exceptional direction The One is erotic not only through the artfully graphic script: the enactment of the man’s nightmare, for example, in which he dreams of being a strong, lusty, wild cave-man on a quest to possess the sensual, wet, sultry cave-woman is breath-y and angry and (in the scorching lighting) hot.

Faultlessly, this is the kind of theatre that will send lovers and un-lovers into complex and confronting journeys as they study their own bedroom affairs.

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